Wat’s cookin’, good lookin’?

This week brings me to Chiang Mai, the largest city in northern Thailand, and the historic capital of the Lanna Kingdom from 1296 to 1775. The Lanna Kingdom at times comprised parts of Burma, Thailand and China; at various times, it was controlled by each of these. The old city of Chiang Mai, found in the center of the modern city, retains the moat and parts of the walls that provided protection from enemies including the Burmese and the Mongols.

I had three major things to do in Chiang Mai:

1. See temples, aka wats. There are only 300 of them scattered throughout the area!

2. Learn to cook Thai food. What better place to do it?!

3. Hang out with some elephants, natives of Thailand’s jungle highlands.

Well, success! I’ll cover 1 & 2 here, and 3 next post (it will be worth the wait!)

Chiang Mai’s most famous temple is Wat Phra That Doi Suthep, found just outside the city on Doi (meaning mountain or hill) Suthep. Legend has it that a Lanna king was presented with a relic- Buddha’s shoulder bone. The relic was broken in two, with one piece enshrined in a temple; the other piece was placed on the back of a sacred white elephant and released into the jungle. The elephant was said to have climbed Mount Suthep, trumpeted three times at the top and died. Wat Doi Suthep was build on that spot.

309 steps lead up to the temple from the road, lined with matching dragons:

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These set the tone for the splendor of the temple complex itself. In the main temple building, a large walled square with an open courtyard, you find the golden chedi (also known as a stupa or pagoda).

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It is surrounded by gilt Buddha statues in all poses, fresh flower offerings and yellow candles, and shrines in the middle of each of its four sides.

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The surrounding walls, which are covered in mosaic depictions of the lives of Buddha, also have large shrine rooms, some with monks offering blessings to supplicants. People walk around the chedi three times, offering prayers to Buddha and requests for blessings.

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Outside this area, you find massive ceremonial bells and other smaller shrines- smaller, but no less elaborate.

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I do wish I’d had a guide to describe the parts and functions of the temple, but I certainly can appreciate the artistry on my own! And, I ran into some one I know!

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And her twin!

Just kidding.

After the temple, I returned to Chiang Mai for a cooking lesson- How to Burn your Tongue 101, with Baan Thai Cookery.

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I got to concoct 4 dishes, plus we visited a local market and discussed the essential ingredients for Thai food: lemongrass and kaffir lime, ginger or galangal, basil, chiles, fish sauce and shrimp paste, cilantro, rice and noodles, and chiles, plus eggplants of all shapes and sizes, mushrooms and mushroom sauce, oyster sauce, and chiles.

First up: stir fried rice noodles or Phad Thai. Baan Thai provides all the ingredients in the perfect amount for 1 serving; all I had to do was chop my tofu, cilantro, scallion and garlic. Stir frying itself took less than 5 minutes, but there was definitely some prep we newbies didn’t have to worry about- cutting up chicken, softening the rice noodles. And it came out quite good (I are it before I took an iPhoto tho)! I think mine needed a bit more fish sauce, but that’s something I get to play with as I make Thai food at home.

Next up: soup and appetizers. I chose to make coconut soup with chicken, and this is when the chilies really came into play. They suggested 1 if you don’t want spicy; 2 for medium, and 3 for tourist spicy (10 for Thai spicy! How do they taste anything after that!?). I did 3; you just smash them with the flat blade of a knife and throw them in the coconut milk to boil with the lemongrass, kafir lime and ginger (the holy trifecta of Thai cooking).

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Plus lime, tomato, cilantro, oyster mushrooms, onion and scallions

The whole object of Thai food is to balance sweet, salty, sour and bitter; my soup did it well, and was probably my favorite dish.

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Awkward selfie, with soup!

My papaya salad was a little heavy hitting on the spicy, though!

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Turns out, when you smash three chilies with a mortar and pestle as a part of a dressing, they release ALL the heat- I had trouble eating more than half of my creation, and even the gal teaching me said it was pretty spicy (but not Thai spicy, still, and she liked it). I did like that salad, too- I’ll have to try that out at home, I guess you can substitute carrot and cucumber when green papaya isn’t available (and when is it?).

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Last but not least was the Penang curry- a red curry for which we made our own chili paste, chopping red chilies to a paste-like consistency and combining those with other pulverized spices and shrimp paste. Penang is quite a mild curry made with coconut milk, but I think it could have used just a touch more heat.

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Wok time!

Overall, I was delighted with my Thai cooking class- anyone up for a dinner party?

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